Brandywine, Black

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Brandywine, Black
Maturity late
Growth habit indet.
Leaf type potato
Fruit color black
Fruit shape beefsteak
Fruit size medium
Fruit type slicer
Variety type open-pollinated
Country USA

B.C KO T

90 days, indet., potato leaf, medium size smooth fruits, dusky purple/black, fruit is a bit smaller than the Brandywine that grew from the same seed pack, very juicy and seedy. 'Discovered' among Brandywine plants grown in 2004 from the seed packet bought from a commercial source. Subsequent growouts showed that this variant was stable.
Seed Source 
Reimer Seeds / B.C KO T 04 / CV PC Organics 03|2004, 2005}}

IL LO N

90 days, indet., potato leaf, fair yield of 8-12 oz purple-brown fruit, good flavor.
Source 
Reimer Seeds / OK ME D 99 (Darrell Merrell of Tulsa, Oklahoma) / Tomato Growers Supply 98

Location: Oblong, Illinois


NY GA S

Large beefsteak fruit on potato-leaved plants. Beautiful deep purple tomatoes with a sweet and earthy taste.

Location: Southold, NY


History

  • Discovered in the Brandywine fields of Seeds by Design in California, likely a natural cross between Brandywine and an unknown black. May still be genetically unstable, as both regular and potato leaf versions are in circulation.
  • The original cross was potato leaf, but subsequent growouts by Darrell Merrell of Oklahoma (OK ME D) showed both potato and regular leaf plants, with majority being regular leaf (8 out of 250 plants).
  • It is likely that various SSE members that list this variety in the SSE Yearbook have different segregating lines, some of them being stable, and some may not.
  • Jere Gettle, the owner of Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds , introduced another strain (or another variety all together) in 2008 Baker Creek Catalog, called True Black Brandywine (see [1]). Jere received the seed from William Woys Weaver of Pennsylvania (PA WE W), who claimed that his grandfather obtained seed from breeder Dr. Harold E. Martin in the late 1920s. A few tomato folks at Tomatoville questioned the authenticity of the 'true' strain, specifically around its recent introduction (2007-2008).
  • Many seed vendors do not mention the leaf type, and it is not clear which version of Black Brandywine they offer.

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